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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/12/2021 in all areas

  1. Feels like forever since I ran a race thanks to Covid so I jumped when I had the opportunity to team up for this race. The race consists of a 2 mile running leg, 18 miles on the bike, and another 2 mile running leg. One of my RBs (J) who cycles frequently was interested in teaming up for the race so I was glad to take the running legs. The duathlon is a fund raiser for the group that maintains the Byway. Three other RBs from my LRG were there to volunteer so there were familiar faces around. The race was scheduled to start at 8:30 AM Sunday. I arrived around 7:45 and met J in one of the parking areas The temp was 50 degrees with a chilly wind - much different from the 70+ degree temps over the past 2 weeks, but good for running. We set up in the transition and I ran a few miles to warm up. J is into the local Tri scene and thought we had a good chance to win the teams division. Our optimism didn't last. We saw a local cycling club who calls themselves the Dutch Flyers had sent a team to the race. They're fast. Very fast, just as the name implies. J pointed out our competition. He recognized their cyclist from some Triathlons and knew him to be very fast. There was no way J was going to beat him so I would have to beat their runner to give J a head start on the bike. After a briefing on traffic, road hazards, and transitions it was time to line up. It was so nice to line up with a group of runners again. Around 100 runners were lined up. Soon the horn sounded and off we went. My prerace strategy was to hold back a little on the first leg to save something for the second leg. That strategy wasn't going to work if we were going to beat the Dutch Flyers, so I went out hard. The running route was an out and back with some rolling terrain. 7:15, 7:14. So much for holding back. Apparently our competition didn't send a fast runner because I beat him soundly to give J a 3 minute head start on the bike. We made the transition and J started the cycling leg. J figured he would need around 55 minutes to cover 18 miles on a hilly course. I watched other runners come in and make their transition. It's impressive to see runners who can jump on the bike after running and continue to crush it. After 40 minutes or so I started warming up again with some easy running and mixed in some pickups. Cyclists started arriving back to the transition area so I waited near the timing mat for J. The transition area wasn't policed. The Dutch Flyer rider crossed the mat. Like clockwork, his daughter was right there to peel the Velcro chip strap off his leg and hand it to their runner. All I could think was really, did that just happen? J wasn't kidding when he said the Dutch Flyer rider was fast. J had a 3 minute head start and averaged 19.5 MPH on a hilly, windy course, but this guy caught him and proceeded to finish 1 minute before J. I could do nothing but stand there and watch their runner go as the rider and his daughter laughed thinking they had us now. After that 1 minute which felt like an eternity J pulled in. The 2 of us and our cold sluggish fingers took forever to peel off the Velcro chip strap. As soon as it was in my hand I took off running hoping I could chase down the runner who now had a head start with only 2 miles in this leg. The fast first leg definitely took something out of me. I pushed to the point just before gasping starts. Finally, just before the turn around I came over an incline and saw him about 100 yards in front of me. It was going to take a while to catch him. I hit the turn around just after my watch showed 7:25 for the first mile. I started back on the uphill hoping the incline would slow him down and tried to step on the gas. The incline must have slowed him because I caught him quickly and passed. I knew I had to put some distance between him so I dug deep and tried to draw on anything I had left. The last .5 seemed so long, but soon enough I crossed the finish line with the Dutch Flyer runner still behind me. The other RBs from my LRG were there and were cheering as I finished. 7:20. Crushed it. Beat those Dutch Flyers. Stick to the bike my friends or come bigger. The post race food was provided by 99 Restaurants and was good. I really enjoyed this experience. Not sure if I enjoyed it enough to dust off my bike, but would definitely do the team thing again. I'd like to find another race before Rehoboth. Forgot how much I'd missed the racing scene. Run well my friends.
    2 points
  2. Very sorry to hear this. I had to stay away from all forms of exercise after dealing with chronic itbs injury where my hip was aching all the time even while not running. After seeing all kinds of doctors, many imagings done, three different PTs over two years period, I just stopped everything including stretching and strength workouts for about 2 months resting completely. I build back gradually starting with my PT workouts then slowly increase my milage and incorporated strength exercise too. I have flare-ups here and there but never lasted more than for few days. I hope the complete rest will do you good. And be patient coming back. Good luck!
    2 points
  3. I've been stewing over here with my strained ITB, and this gives me a much needed jolt of excitement. Racing! Way to crush those Dutch.
    1 point
  4. Hi people! I think I can tell the same story as a lot of you can tell right now. Maybe. You'll see that I don't talk to a lot of runners these days. Running has been a part of my identity since I was in high school, although I have always struggled with my relationship with running. Sometimes it was just running. Sometimes I was happy to go out for a routine run and felt that I needed it more than I felt obligated to it. There have been times that sticking to my running expectations created inner turmoil and feelings of insufficiency. I've ignored injuries, I've nursed depression with months of not running. I have won small local road races just as many times as I have walked off a course to a DNF (neither many times, but it's an example of being all over the place). But running has always been personal to me. My father and I have a long history of running the Peachtree Road Race together. I've been living out of state since 2014, and moved back in late 2019. COVID crushed the excitement of PRR2020, but the old man is still going, so we got another chance, at long last, this year. The race was great, as it always is. But as we are always evolving as people, I had my first "no shame run in public" where I just let my body do what it could. Yes, I am out of shape, and I knew better than to expect anything faster than 10:00 min miles. There's always that edge that racing and competition give you, and I always think that maybe I will pull out some magical time due to that hyper-drive state. But this year I didn't want to. I wanted to be right where I was, I wanted to do exactly what I could, and I didn't want to feel inferior because of it. Running is so mental, in all the ways one can interpret that. What a freeing feeling it was to just let go and enjoy a day with my dad. He whooped me, of course, but it was fun! All this said, I have realized that my struggle with my own ideal of what kind of runner I SHOULD be has drained the enjoyment out of it all. I have isolated myself from making runner friends, from running groups, and even from talking about running. I made it too hard and too high pressure. So today, I set the Garmin face to show only my heart rate. Whenever I couldn't slow my pace down enough to get down from threshold, I walked. I even walked in front of another runner; no posturing! I walked most of the way home! And I was happy for it! Anyway, I know it's kind of quiet here these days. I hope that just maybe any of you who come by this get a little boost. My name's Crystal.
    1 point
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