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  1. Today
  2. The Loop would like to wish all members celebrating their birthday today a happy birthday. running_eng --ChicagoPhil (54)
  3. Yesterday
  4. Yes! The buying speed was one reason that I never delved into tris before. Just doesn't feel right. I messaged a local guy who does bike fits so I will see him soon. Definitely will look into the wheel cover. I had to change my tires recently. I went tubeless and they did give me a nice bump in speed. Someone else also said I should get a better helmet for aero. I also should get a better helmet in case of crashing. (One of my friends crashed on one of our group rides - tire bump. Ended up with a brain bleed. 😢) Might get more comfortable aero bars. Thanks for all of the tips! Beautiful bike!!
  5. Thanks! I'm a beach girl so used to muck, seaweed, etc. Lol. Hope you are doing well!
  6. Miss you too! We didn't get our summer fix. You'll be at Rehoboth, correct?
  7. Fantastic job! Considering also the muck-wading/swimming (ew)… massive congratulations!
  8. Last week
  9. the bike is very annoying because you can buy speed, which means to be competitive you have to spend money.. every single expensive bit of my tri-bike is from ebay ;-) including the frame, bought it for $500 and then built it up.. A new bike won't do much for speed. Cheaper and faster is to buy a few bits for the existing bike. A disc rear wheel is worth 2min or so over the 70.3 bike ride. That is relatively easy, $100 for a wheel cover from wheelbuilder.com. Real discs are thousands but the wheel cover is about 98% as effective aerodynamically as a real disc.. front wheel isn't so easy, but can be found used for a couple hundred. Another minute or two. Tires and tubes are startlingly important - mostly through rolling resistance. Check bicyclerollingresistance.com for more detail than you could possibly want ;-) I tend to get the mid-range tires that are a bit cheaper and more durable, something like Continental 4000. Then latex tubes in them for race day. Ordinary inner tubes are butyl and slower and less comfortable than latex. Other cheap improvements that give good bang for the buck, - aero helmet - tight fitting bike top with sleeves, and keep it zipped up ;-) A generally good aero helmet is the Garneau P09, though I have trouble paying $200 for a bike helmet. My aero helmet was $100 used from a friend who was upgrading. Position on the bike is the single biggest factor in speed, because of aerodynamics. Aerodynamics is weird and wildly specific to the individual. The only way to tell if a bike fit or position change will actually be faster is to go to a wind tunnel, or do some homebrew aero testing. I used to ride a small circuit on the road out at a state park at max effort, early in the morning to avoid wind and traffic, and do 5 repetitions with each setup. Averaging the times gives a rough idea of whether it is any better. Things like angling the aerobars up, moving them up and down, saddle etc.
  10. Way to go OC! You crushed it! Congrats. Miss you.
  11. ocrunnergirl

    Devil on the Divide

    Amazing! I love all of the pictures! Thanks for sharing and way to win your AG!
  12. BANGLE

    Devil on the Divide

    Wow! Way to conquer that beast. Winner!
  13. I got a lot of compliments on the space buns! They were the product of insomnia, but I'll have to do them again.
  14. This race director loves sand finishes!! Lol. I don’t think it’s the norm though. I like trying different things because there are zero expectations. A finish is a win. Now that I’ve got goals … ugh!!
  15. I’m just too dumb to stop. Lol. The sand was super short so not a big deal. Definitely not a fan of beach running. Thanks for reading.
  16. It is weird how separate they are. Swim for me is not a cardio event. I just have to get through it. When you get off of the bike you think there is no way that you can….yet you can because it uses different muscles
  17. OMG!! That’s exactly what I’m thinking!! Honestly if you saw my running leading up to this event you would know that I left so much out there in that event alone. Definitely thinking about a professional bike fit or a new bike … if I can afford it
  18. Dave

    Devil on the Divide

    The views look like they'd be worth the pain.
  19. Must have been those super cute pigtails.
  20. Finish on the sand. Add that to my list of reasons I'll never do a tri. I know you don't do any of this to impress me, but I will say it anyway - I'm seriously impressed.
  21. well done ! and so it begins ;-) That's exactly what happened when I started tri.. hm wait, I'm nearly on the podium, just a bit more training maybe ? a new bike perhaps ?
  22. doug in co

    Devil on the Divide

    22km (14 miles or so) and 3400ft of climbing, followed by descent again. This was the high point of my day.. I knew this was going to be hard, but it was still harder than expected, more like a marathon effort than a half. Took me 3hr 53min which is longer than any marathon I've (yet) run. To be fair if I did run a marathon now it would be in the 4h30 region. Not much running in the previous months as I'd been nursing a bad knee which my physical therapist told me not to run on. The first commandment of running injury recovery is, Always Listen to your Physical Therapist - you shall have no other desires but what they say.. A bit of swimming since the other physical therapist had fixed the biceps tendonitis, and a good bit of MTB riding on gravel trails with plenty climbing, thought it would be enough. Ha no. Yes, I had two PTs, one for biceps another for knee. Reminds me of the old joke, 'Trust people ? Trust people ?! you sound just like my other psychologist'. Start at the bottom of Jones Pass, near the Henderson mine. Here they mine molybdenum and they're always recruiting, molyjobs.com posters all around the race site even. 2200 feet over 4 miles to the first aid station, cut off at two hours. I think I ran about 200yds total in those 4 miles, the rest was a determined steady plod at maximum HR while panting heartily. Here's the Alltrails.com picture from the top of the pass where the aid station is. We started away down in the woods somewhere. A failure to read the topo map accurately brought a fine surprise, OK we're up the pass now, but there's still a thousand feet to climb along the Continental Divide trail to that high point. More plods, with occasional jogs. This pic from the race photographer @jordanchapell sums it up - a young woman leaping swiftly down the trail behind me, me firmly earthbound grinding along. Views were terrific. The winds howled over the Divide. When unpinning the number later, I found the winds whipping it around had actually bent the safety pins nearly open. Here's a pic I took at one point while panting on the side of the trail, trying to calm my heart down as it tried to leap out of my chest. Runners all across the horizon, a real highwayman's farewell.. Most of this was runnable if you had working legs, which I did not. It seems I overcooked the climb. Staggered on and out to the turnaround above Herman Gulch to get my bib punched. The volunteer asked if I was OK, must have been looking a bit ragged. Assured him I had a flask of Coca-Cola and two Honey Stingers left, I'd be fine. Another race photographer @sohboyum shows the start of the downhill section. I did break from a walk into a sort of wobbling lurch but you can't tell it from the picture.. One of the volunteers said, "it's all downhill from here !" Replied, "even if that's not true I'm going to believe it - lie to me, please". ;-) Lumped and bumped down the rocks and roots of Herman Gulch, passing day hikers who most politely stepped off the trail for us sweaty plodders. The finish at 22k was also the aid station for the 50k runners. I watched them come in and leave again, legs trembling with fatigue. I could not have left again. A bus, masked, back to the Empire ballfield where the food and beer awaited. Sat down and stuck in the chair until they called my name. Turns out I'd won my AG by default, being the only one. (art by idigoddpairings) Now the proud owner of a genuine Norwegian cowbell, made of genuine brass rifle shell casings from the Norwegian military. What a great prize. Beer by Tommyknocker brewery in Idaho Springs, excellent. Drank two without feeling a thing. Said farewell to my table acquaintances, and went up the road to find a little creek for a bit of fishing. Once I get out of the house I like to get full value from the excursion. Too tired to fish effectively and left soon for a nap, still did get a bit of a lower-leg soak in the cold water and a couple pretty miniatures of trout.
  23. theoretically, heat training has much the same effects as altitude training.. so it will pay off, sometime ;-)
  24. The short: I nabbed my best ever overall placing with what was by far my slowest time at this race, with 2nd overall female in 38:15. Due to various factors (the heat, peak marathon training, seeing two friends suffer devastating losses in the days before the race), my expectations for the race were not high. In retrospect, I am quite happy with the place and quite meh about the time. Results are here. My Strava activity is here. Better together The long: I continued my hot weather racing streak at the Plaza 10k, with no clouds in the sky and 80 degrees on race morning. Because the race fell 3 weeks before my season goal marathon, I planned to train right through it, and the forecast made me confident that was the right decision (i.e., I won't run a fast time at 80 degrees no matter how rested I am). The week before the race I had workouts that never felt good but that I hit my paces on, which is typical for me in the throes of marathon training, and a few days before the race I saw 104 miles on my rolling 7. I don't think racing without a taper necessarily hurts my performance, but I certainly don't feel as fresh; I just grit it out when feeling tired like I do in a lot of workouts during marathon training! Before things went downhill in the days leading up to the race, my goal was to place as high as I could. The best I'd ever placed at the race previously was 6th overall female. I also hoped to win overall masters female, and to break the Missouri age 40 state record of 38:04. Race morning I warmed up with friends and tried to enjoy the moment, but had a really hard time getting my head in the game. In the few days prior to the race, I had a friend who lost her son unexpectedly and another friend who lost her husband, so it was difficult to place importance on the race. My heart wasn't in the race, it was with them. Race instinct took over to some degree, and I slowly upped the effort. Like every Kansas City race, this isn't an even split course, though this is the flattest course I run in that area with about 170 feet of elevation gain. Mile 2 was 6:03 and mile 3 6:11, though as usual I didn't look at my watch during the race. Typically this race has a clock at the 5k but this year they didn't have a clock or timing mat, which I missed! Sometime around the halfway point, Chandler and I pulled away from Amy. I felt confident that I could hold onto 1 and 2 with Chandler; I had no pep but the pace also didn't feel that hard, and I knew Amy had to be feeling a lot worse than I was to let us gap her.I saw several fast Kansas City women on the starting line, and knew they would push me in the race. From the gun a woman I didn't know was ahead for the first half mile or so, then me and the ladies I was running with (Chandler and Amy) passed into the top 3 female positions. I knew both Chandler and Amy were talented runners, and I was hopeful for a top 3 finish because our start felt very conservative (6:13 on the flat first mile) and no other women were around. Running with Chandler is always a pleasure! I really enjoyed sharing most of this race and most of Rock the Parkway with her. She is kind, positive, and helps me get the best out of myself. With where I was mentally and emotionally for this one, running with a friend beside me was extra helpful. Mile 4 is downhill and usually my favorite mile of this race, but this year they were doing road construction in that area and it was all rivety. It was not ideal terrain for Next % shoes, that's for sure! My friend Andrew, who went out faster than me, hopped up on the sidewalk for a moment to avoid the crappy road, and I considered following him but it cut a corner off the course slightly so I didn't because I sure wasn't getting disqualified in my one chance of a top 2 finish at this event! He realized the situation soon and jumped back on the I'm-going-to-twist-an-ankle road, and shortly after that Chandler and I passed him. I encouraged him to go with us, but his faster start had caught up with him a bit. My 4th mile was 5:51. Laughing at Brent around mile 4 Mile 5 goes back up the incline the course goes down in mile 4, on the opposite side of the divided road. Some years I have loathed that climb, but it was okay this time, possibly because I was running so much slower than I ever have at this race! The split was 6:13, which is about even effort to our other miles with the elevation gain. Chandler and I were still side-by-side. Shortly after we passed mile 4, there was an aid station on the side I was on. She mentioned she was going to get a water, telling me because she was going to have to cross either right in front of or behind me to grab it. I told her I'd grab it for her since it was on my side. I picked up a bottle and passed it to her, and it was caught on camera. Despite the shot being unflattering of me, I absolutely love it! Team work makes the dream work! We passed mile 5 together, and right after Chandler began pulling away. I tried to stay with her but I didn't have any get up and go. She gradually extended her lead, and I tried not to give up but my heart really wasn't in it and I settled to some degree. If I'd kept at it mentally, she'd have still gotten me, but not by as much - she finished 15 seconds ahead of me and my last mile was 6:02 and final kick 5:45 pace. Clock shot I ended up finishing in 38:15 gun time. They didn't give chip times to the overall winners (i.e., results have chip and gun time as the same, since that is how overall prizes are awarded), but I figured since I started between Christian and Andrew, whose chip times were -10 seconds and -12 seconds respectively, my chip time would have been 38:04 (tying the state record). State records go by gun time so gun time is all that matters there, but of course that would happen to me! Much like in the half marathon, I know I can run significantly faster than the record time, but I cannot do it in 80 degrees. Post-race fist bump caught on film After the race, I headed out on the Trolley Trail for 11 more miles, which is too long to call a cool down. I felt fine running very easy, and finished up my final 20+ mile day before my next marathon. Andrew accompanied me for the whole addendum as part of his Chicago Marathon training, which was quite helpful. I'm not sure what the future holds for my next race or for everything else in life, but I know who holds the future! God's plan often doesn't make sense to us on earth, but it's always best. Miles from Mentor Splits
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